Figures and trends

During the almost 6 years Tracelink has been around, we have collected quite a large amount of data. Our database contains information about orders, assignments, hourly records, stock consumption etc. and at the same time we have obtained the published accounting figures for the companies. We have anonymized the registrations and made some simple analyzes on how Tracelink is used and what the result is - across all customers. Are there methods and workflows that help the business?

As we get more data into our database, we will in the coming months work on expanding and nuancing the analyzes.

First a few numbers that may not say as much in the first place:

Tracelink's customers have:

  • on average a gross turnover of just over 6 mill. DKK (just under DKK 400,000 per user)
  • on average had a net income growth of 1.2 mill. DKK in the last 2 financial years
  • typically 16 registered users (the largest has more than 500 ...)
  • on average a length of time record of just under 4 hours
  • an average duration of an order of just under 23 hours

When we subsequently compare the different variables, we can begin to look for relationships and trends:

The diagram above shows the relationship between the number of Tracelink users in the company and the company's net profit, compared to the labor cost (indicated by the diameter of the circles)

The above chart shows the relationship between the number of orders and gross sales in the latest accounts, compared to the number of Tracelink users in the company (indicated by the diameter of the circles)

The above chart shows the relationship between the number of orders and the net result in the latest accounts, maintained by how much Tracelink is used by the company (indicated by the diameter of the circles)

There is a tendency for larger order volumes to result in better results when Tracelink is used more intensively.

The above chart shows the relationship between change in revenue and change in labor costs over the last 2 financial years, compared to how much Tracelink is used by the company (indicated by the diameter of the circles)

One can, as one would expect, see that there is some linear relationship. At the same time, you can see a slight tendency for some of the companies that use much of Tracelink's functionality to actually save relatively much on labor costs while growing revenue.

The above is not a scientific analysis, the accounting figures are not fresh, and of course there are also mis-registrations among the customers' Tracelink data. But you can consider whether some of the graphs give you the opportunity to either try new functions or test new workflows. To us, it seems like common sense.

If you have any questions about the numbers, you are very welcome to contact us.